Aisa Yeh Jahaan

Aisa Yeh Jahaan

2.9 451 Ratings

Release Date :

  • Critics Rating 2.0/5
  • MJ Rating 2.5/5
  • Rate now
  • Write a review

plot

Aisa Yeh Jahaan is 2015 India’s First Carbon Neutral Film directed by Biswajeet Bora and produced by Maya Kholie.

Aisa Yeh Jahaan Credit & Casting

Graham Rogers

Credit

    Cast (in credits order)

    Aisa Yeh Jahaan Audience Review

    Educational Drama!

    | by Yatharth Chauhan |
    Rated 2.5 / 5
    | See all my reviews

    Write a review

    Review Aisa Yeh Jahaan & earn 20 DM Points. Exchange DM points for cashbacks*

    * Powered by FAVCY

    At a runtime of nearly 129 minutes, Biswajeet Bora’s Aisa Yeh Jahaan is more of a schooling lecture than a movie to be honest. The preaching here is not subjective to a particular point but mottled to several problems that our director wants to address. Parenting, family values, northeastern discrimination and most important of all ‘Environment’. It was almost as if the director wanted to let his intentions know loud and clear on all counts. Bound with a simple story and idealistic treatment, the film has a promotional tag line that reads ‘India’s first carbon neutral film’. No prizes for guessing, it emphasis on the growing environmental troubles in the concrete urban cities and metros.  

     

    Rajib Saika (Palash Sen) a middle class multinational employee lives with his nagging and disgruntled wife Ananya (Ira Dubey) and daughter Kuhi in Mumbai. While Rajib is a simple man with his heart in his homeland of Assam, wife Ananya aspires to be rich and successful. Palash plays a man who would outrage against his maid being called a ‘chinky’ and endorse his daughter’s idea of planting a tree in their home. Distanced with the northeastern roots of her husband, Ananya feels uncomfortable with someone talking to her daughter in a language other than English and Hindi. The fast half introduces us to a deep contrast between the lead couple and later follows it up in the urban and northeastern divide. The narrative takes a turn when Ananya decides to make Kuhi a child model in television ads to support their family.

     

    The treatment is expressively too old fashioned but the director marginally succeeds in drawing a substantial contrast between the urban and remote landscape. While on one hand, we are kept reminded of how nature is vital to our survival, the other lays stress on the disturbed, unhealthy and dull life away from home. The satire is pretty evident and remains mostly constant like how Ananya’s homemade Pasta isn’t received well in the village and how she responds by throwing the gifted mangoes out of the car. At one point of time, one of Ananya’s friend says to another, “Sheher mein log grammatically english sahi bole ya nahi, politically zarur sahi bolte hain.”


    As much as you try and let the film grab you with its heart, the inconsistent screenplay and too much of education takes it away. The characters are so loosely sketched that Pakhi the protagonist as a northeastern maid goes largely unnoticed. One would have expected the writer to draft a stronger character. The events at one point of time start being repetitive and even a 2 hour film appears to be unduly stretched. The drama looks a charade of half-baked characters trying to lecture on something or the other. The only takeaways from Aisa Yeh Jahaan would be the sole intentions of what the filmmaker wanted to convey. Not quite surprisingly, film’s theme has been acknowledged at an international stage.

     

    It was pleasant to see Palash Sen on screen now that he isn’t really active otherwise. Playing a struggling family guy, he does take away some empathy from the audiences. The actor is well complimented by his on-screen partner Ira Dubey who’s finding her feet settling in the industry. A performance like this would lift her chances up. Though the direction and writing come up as major letdown for the film. The music doesn’t leave any lasting impact either with just one track finding some connect.

      

    Go for Aisa Yeh Jahaan if you want your kids to know about environment and other common Indian problems. But with a dull family drama and dreary screenplay in place, not sure they would really enjoy it!

    • Storyline
    • Direction
    • Acting
    • Cinematography
    • Music

    Movies You Might Like