Arima Nambi

Arima Nambi

3.5 850 Ratings

Directed by : Anand Shankar

Release Date :

  • MJ Rating 3.5/5
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Verdict

“Arima Nambi makes good use of its thriller genre to enhance the impact that's more Hollywodian than an attempt to cater to regional tastes. It benefits from good performances by the lead cast.”

Arima Nambi Credit & Casting

Vikram Prabhu

Credit

Cast (in credits order)

Arima Nambi Audience Review

Arima Nambi

| by Karthik Keramalu |
Rated 4.0 / 5
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Vikram Prabhu has already played the role of a common man who takes things into his own hands when the need arises in his previous film Ivan Veramathiri. He takes a big leap and lands right on the lap of Arima Nambi, a thriller with an expected climax.


 

Anamika Raghunath (Priya Anand) and Arjun Krishna (Vikram Prabhu) sort of fall for each other at the first sight; a date the next day takes Arjun to her home and the real action starts here. Anamika gets kidnapped while Arjun goes to a police station to lodge a complaint. He is helped by S. I. Arumugam (M. S. Baskar) whose character is modeled on Yugi Sethu’s from Ramanaa.


 

Arjun understands that the situation is tighter than he had initially thought, he has no choice but to find Anamika himself without the noses of police poking in as he knows about them being hand in glove with the kidnappers. He does find Anamika and the two run and drive around the city and play hide-and-seek with the police until the truth is out.


 

While Priya Anand remains a little more than a poster girl in the film, it is the screenplay that makes the viewer sit for two and a half hours. A romantic song toward the climax brings the pace to a halt. J. D. Chakravarthy is a good politician for the cameras but a murderer behind them, a clichéd role is a letdown.  


Sivamani’s music is average, crucial scenes are bombed with loud music, especially the chase sequences. Much was expected from the composer but he lets the butterfly out of his sight. R. D. Rajasekhar’s cinematography is dull and so are the action scenes that could have lifted the film a little more. The tying up of events to bring a closure to the thriller reminds us of a recent Venkat Prabhu film Biriyani. In Biriyani, Karthi could depend on his friends whereas in Arima Nambi, Vikram Prabhu has nobody to fall back on but Priya Anand. Surprisingly, first half is edgier than the second half – we get the thread of the story about fifteen minutes into the film but as we enter the second half the story becomes predictable. This is where the writing falls from the second floor to the parking lot.


Arima Nambi is an overnight thriller as the entire film begins and ends in two nights. Only if music, cinematography, and the last half hour were given some touches, the film would have become the best undoubtedly, so far, of 2014. Yet Anand Shankar’s debut directorial maintains the rightful title of an action thriller.

 

 

  • Storyline
  • Direction
  • Acting
  • Cinematography
  • Music