Asura

Asura

3.2 201 Ratings

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  • MJ Rating 2.0/5
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Verdict

“A solid plot and a taut screenplay makes this a winner!”

Asura Credit & Casting

Nara Rohit

Credit

Cast (in credits order)

Asura Audience Review

If Characters Of Asura We're Chess Players, They'd Suck Big Time

| by kiranm |
Rated 2.5 / 5
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Asura starts off without any waste of time - a fight scene where Nara Rohit (whose becoming tubbier by the day) shrivels a bunch of puny guys trying to escape from the central Jail in Coastal Andhra. The excessive focus on Rohit’s khaki pants and brown shoes establish that he's a jailer. He should just keep a cop uniform handy from now onwards, thanks to his obsession with law enforcement roles. Shortly after the fight sequence and some image building dialogues, we jump into another Sepia effect song with plenty backlight, dusty airs and Rayban clad tubby Rohit marching about.

 

After the narcissism dose is done with, we get down to business. Asura is actually all about a fuss - there's an illogically evil diamond merchant called Chalie who brutally kills his step brothers and sisters. On the other hand there is the morally conflicted Dharma Teja (played by Rohit) who, as his name suggests, believes in results and not rules, in order to uphold dharma. After comparisons between Yugas and context of Lord Rama's actions and his own, we are told that the killer Charlie is sentenced to death by hanging. Only, Charlie loves giving hollow threats about how he plans to live at any cost. 

 

The whole movie revolves around how the hanging is postponed with Charlie's mischiefs and how Dharma tries to bring him to justice. In this process, we get clear exhibits of how Telugu film makers of the contemporary times concentrate so less on logic of stories and so much more of fancy things that are included just because they look/sound good. Deep powerful dialogues when given a little thought reveal that they're actually pretty hollow. Threats by the villain are in vain and illogical. The plots that the villain cooks up are something like this - Charlie to One Mr. X, "Hi! I'm Charlie - I plan to escape by death sentence. I'll give you diamonds and get you bail. Do whatever, just get me out”. Mr. X to another 2 villains Mr. Y and Mr. Z, “Anna, there is an amazing deal. If we break Charlie out we’ll get diamonds – plan something and do it”. Mr Y and Z – “lets kidnap loved ones of everyone associated with the hanging, including the executioner and blackmail them to keep Charlie alive. Just keep postponing the hanging till we go with the flow and something happens to ruin our plan”.

 

So yes, this keeps happening till when the hero gives us some convenient twists at the end of the story to make it seem like he was the champ all through out.

 

Asura suffers from a poor story, which couldn’t be saved with all the cinematography, music, fancy bokehs and backlights and sepia effects in the world. The actors do a good job. The music is nothing to die for. The production values are on a budget but well used. A little more effort into actually backtracking stories while constructing them and rebooting it to check for logical errors would have made this fancy looking film something worthwhile. Right now, it’s a just a good title with a credible actor who people seem to like nowadays and some pretentious heavy dharma-based poetry.

 

  • Storyline
  • Direction
  • Acting
  • Cinematography
  • Music
  • On June 06, 2015

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