Double Barrel

Double Barrel

3.0 106 Ratings

Release Date :

  • Critics Rating 2.8/5
  • MJ Rating 2.3/5
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plot

Double Barrel is a action comedy film written and directed by Lijo Jose Pellissery.

Verdict

“Mindless fun”

Double Barrel Credit & Casting

Prithviraj

Double Barrel Audience Review

DOUBLE "BORE"el.

| by Ajitesh Rajeevan |
Rated 1.5 / 5
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The movie started out with Stanley Kubrick's quote, "If it can be written, or thought, it can be filmed". You realise that this was some sort of a warning right from the moment the movie starts. 


Prithviraj Sukumaran produced this highly crazy, nonsensical, spoof like gangster flick and also decided to act in it for the sole purpose of introducing something different to Malayalam cinema. This is definitely not the kind of difference people are expecting. With Malayalam movies garnering attention from whole new strata, "Double Barrel" comes as the biggest disappointment of this season. The quirky, retro style, limitlessly (un)funny situations that the makers of the movie tried to create falls flat. Head first, face down. The premise, situations, and crew are all there, stacked and loaded, but the writing turns out to be the greatest flaw of this story. The posters, teasers and trailer of the movie clearly gave people an idea of what to expect, but, the minute the movie starts we all realise that this isn't going to be one bit of what was expected. Lijo Jose Pellissery's craziness seems to have reflected in the script. Abhinandan Ramanujan's camera work, is by far the best aspect of this movie. The bullet shots, haphazard explosions, antique rooms, barren lands, everything comes alive and at the same time makes you feel so bad for having wasted them all on this. Prashanth pillai's score, although exciting and peppy, doesnt help the audience one bit. 


The biggest Villain of this story according to me is the laughter that the actors share with each other on-screen. Whenever two of the characters look at each other, I sunk deep down in my seat and had to prepare myself with dread for those five to eight seconds of seemingly never ending guffaws. The Villain's right hand here are the shoot out scenes. In addition to showing people get shot at, anarchic explosions from nowhere and bombs being thrown like tomatoes at la tomatina, there should have been some sort of a reprise in the form of humour. What you get is a series of repetive, completely unfunny scenes such as a big guy laden with guns and ammo always turning up late for a shootout. You can predict almost all the dreadful scenes and that is what makes things worse. I could overhear a kid sitting in the back row muttering, "Now she is going to ask him to turn the music on, now there are going to be some explosions". 


The story revolves around two diamonds, named Laila and Majunu, one as yellow as a fire, and one as red as the colour of blood. (Believe me, that is just one out of a thousand times you are going to hear that phrase, if you have still decided to watch the movie). Pancho (Prithviraj) and Vinci (Indrajith) are handed those two precious diamonds by a man named "Don" which have no value separately, but are worth 100 crores together. The diamond is also being searched for by other gangs and how all of them come together forms the rest of the story, or does it? I became too exhausted to follow what was going on anyway. I still haven't been able to figure out why Arya chose this script for his entry into Mollywood. He has visibly struggled to lend his own voice to the character. 


There are so many parallel storylines running at the same time, and the suspense factor about how all of them converge at one point, fails too, because they never do. This gangster flick required a twist and it is indeed presented with the actor saying, "Here's the twist you were all expecting". Lijo Jose Pallissery did not realise that off-the-wall crazy stuff alone could never do the magic. This sort of a script requires humour, a lot of it. That is where he fails, miserably.  


Armed with one of the most iconic cinematographers Santhosh Sivan as the producer, whose touch could be felt in almost every frame, Lijo could have given a head shot with this Double Barrel, instead the shot takes a rebound and misses the target, by a very long distance. 

  • Storyline
  • Direction
  • Acting
  • Cinematography
  • Music