Rabhasa

Rabhasa

3.5 1,796 Ratings

Directed by : Santhosh Srinivas

Release Date : | Length : 165 Minutes

  • Critics Rating 2.2/5
  • MJ Rating 2.3/5
  • Rate now
  • Write a review

Verdict

“Rabhasa is just another over-blown display of the tried and tested hit making formula. Its only plus point is Jr NTR breaking the laws of gravity with his stunts. Skip it, unless you are a fan! ”

Rabhasa Credit & Casting

Jr NTR

Cast (in credits order)

Rabhasa Audience Review

Festival of mindless action and over-glorification of "The" hero

| by Krishna Sripada |
Rated 2.0 / 5
| See all my reviews

Write a review

Review Rabhasa & earn 20 DM Points. Exchange DM points for cashbacks*

* Powered by FAVCY

There is a generational shift in the thinking of the movie-makers. It is gladdening to see that instead of catering to a hero who kills hundreds of guys to prove his macho quotient, they are creating the next uber-hero, who can understand, respect and win a woman’s heart. Nevertheless, the route they are taking to achieve that noble effect is still laced with male-chauvinism, pandering to crowds who might forget that message entirely in their adoration for the super-humanised hero and leading to a frenzy of its own.


Plot: Karthik(NTR) is a guy who can beat the crap out of anyone, but at the same time has the itch to help anyone who asks for help. In his bid to bring together two lovers, he unknowingly ends up separating two families which in turn lead to them baying for each other’s blood. Meanwhile, his mom(Jayasudha) requests him to bring home the daughter of her brother Dhanunjay, a corrupt mayor-wannabe(Sayaji Shinde) as her daughter-in-law. How he wins her heart while also bringing the two families he broke together is what makes for the rest of the story.


Cast & Crew: NTR is a good actor and a good dancer and in this movie, he gets the complete range to express himself. Nevertheless, you don’t get to see anything new or fresh in what he does. He participates in the same super-dramatized fights with hundreds of dummy goons. The same punch-lines are thrown at will. The script offered to him too, doesn’t have any authenticity, although it wants to pretend as a thoughtfully written story. Samantha, has good screen space, compared to her other roles and she does a fair job of whatever has been offered to her. Nevertheless, it is intriguing as to whether she gets tired of playing the same role again and again. And again. The rest of the cast including JP, Sayaji Shinde, Nazer, etc. have loud dialogues and not much to do in characters that seem to have walked out of the factory without a brain. Brahmandam though, manages to do what he always does well, make people laugh. His character entry seems forced into the script, but that would probably end up as the only saving grace in otherwise long and needlessly dragged movie.

The Bellamkonda commercial movie, directed by Santhosh Srinivas, shows you the mundaneness that is by now mundane as well in Tollywood. It is funny how the director decides to show the hero in great light, not by using a brilliant script or a lot of twist points but by making the other characters dumb beyond the mortal levels. The fights haven’t been choreographed well and the visual effects have gone totally awry. The sets look overtly gaudy at most times and the flying goons hardly look convincing in any fight, which by the way, come every 15 minutes in the movie. Thaman’s music has plenty of percussions and rhythms, but, lets go of melody totally. Not even one song is catchy and not one song feels part of the story. The cinematography by Shyam Naidu is decent, but the climax fight scene in a temple feels totally amateurish and unreal.


 

Themes: It isfunny how the hero-comes-unites-everyone theme has been beaten to death in Telugu movies. With minor twists and a few villains with their own missions, directors visit the same theme again and again. You had start wondering when movie-makers will offer talented actors like NTR scripts that let them show their acting prowess without pandering to unnatural and unrealistic dialogues, purely to please the fans. One almost wants to wait for movies where the actors themselves take up the responsibility of choosing plots that are sensibly real and really sensible, instead of blurting out massive dialogues one after another extolling their own greatness.

 

All in all, it is a drag of movie that you can ignore, unless you are a die-hard fan of NTR, in which case I wouldn’t really be able to convince you of how logic is at times important in movies, can I?

  • Storyline
  • Direction
  • Acting
  • Cinematography
  • Music