Varsham

Varsham

4.1 303 Ratings

Directed by : Ranjith Sankar

Release Date :

  • Critics Rating 3.9/5
  • MJ Rating 3.3/5
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Verdict

“Varsham has a solid script, stellar performances and brilliant direction. Easily one of the best characters of Mammootty, Varsham is a complete entertainer and a must watch!”

Varsham Credit & Casting

Mammootty

Varsham Audience Review

Right as rain

| by Catherine Rhea Roy |
Rated 3.0 / 5
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Ranjith Sankar is a risky proposition. There is no guaranteeing what you are going to get, for he broke the industry mould with his debut, Passenger, but then he also did slip down a slippery slope with Arjunan Sakshi and Molly Aunty Rocks.

In Varsham, he casts Mammooty in the lead role as Venu who runs a finance company, ‘blade company’ in Malayalam parlance and provides a comfortable life for his wife Nandini (Asha Sarath), his son Anand (Master Nabeesh), and their dog, Jimmy.

In the first half we see that Venu is parsimonious with money, although he does make a lot of it with his nifty, twisty, cut-throat business. And Nandini complains because she is well fed and looked after and frankly very bored. Above this family of some seriously flawed characters rises Anand the adolescent son of Venu and Nandini who is a far better person than his parents and neighbourhood around him. He sings, dances, does karate, and has just been enrolled in swimming lessons, all so that his smug parents can gloat some more about their over achieving son.

What Ranjith has done is to use a dated scheme to call Malayali parents out on this rush to make their kids the alpha child of the pack. He attacks parents who are unable to see beyond the children and the class and school level achievements. And for this Anand has to die, in a freak cardiac arrest. The family loses their bearing and Venu is distraught, on the verge of losing the plot when he sees a light and clings on to it for dear life and scrambles out of the grave he is trying to bury himself in. It is this tremendous loss that sends them spinning before it takes them on a trajectory of realisation after realisation.Nandini finds greater purpose and develops the need individual well-being, besides the husband and mourning.

In performance Mammooty has done well for himself. He is selfish and self-centered and his transformation was real and paced convincingly. Asha Sarath cries a lot, great big heart rending sobs, lumps in her throat that she has to swallow, sad sniffling, she has lost her son and now her husband is also slipping and he refuses to take her hand. And if crying is a defining challenge for any actor, she accomplishes till you are crying with her.

They come with a proficient supporting cast – TG Ravi, the antagonist, petty neighbours Sajitha Madathil and Sunil Sukhada, and Karamana Sudheer as a strong, opinionated priest reminds you so much of his own father in a cassock, it takes us back to Spadikam (1995).

 

The story also gives time to taking down private finance companies as a business model that even now in the age of sophisticated banking has a vicious grip on a large section of people. Varsham may be all too familiar as the sobby, family drama we had left behind but there is something in there to take away with you. 

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