Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol

Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol

3.7 1,364 Ratings

Directed by : Brad Bird

Release Date :

  • MJ Rating 3.7/5
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plot

The IMF is shut down when its implicated in a global terrorist bombing plot. Ghost Protocol is initiated and Ethan Hunt and his rogue new team must go undercover to clear their organizations name. No help, no contact, off the grid. You have never seen a mission grittier and more intense than this.

Verdict

“The film has superb direction, is fast paced and packed with action sequences to die for, making it the best Mission: Impossible to date. Make sure you watch this flick in the theaters!”

Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol Credit & Casting

Paula Patton

Credit

Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol Audience Review

Cruise Over Burj

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Rated 4.0 / 5
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by Ankur Pathak (50 DM Points) | See all my reviews

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In a Moscow prison, Agent Ethan Hunt seems to be a misfit. As clever as the undisguised yet probable cover-up, Hunts loitering around for the strike, and in the intermediate time leading to the opening credits that emblaze the screen, an impeccably crafted hand-combat scene sets the tone straight for the picture unfolding.

Laws of gravity and physics defied, director Brad Bird succeeds in the ultimate of the movie-telling experience that to make sure our suspension of disbelief is stunned for longer than he requires it to be. Hell, you are too nail-bitingly dizzied with the spectacle of a cable-less Cruise gliding Burj to nitpick why the strand of his hair doesnt reflect the towering height, or worse flounder with Newton principles.

The deal here is that theres no deal. After the Kremlin mission to get hold of access-codes relating to nuclear weaponry goes wrong, triggering an abort, Hunt has invited disaster slightly more than he anticipated. Because the same building is later bombed by sinister Kurt Hendrix, implying to the Russians that it is the American scheme, and why not, as it has just occurred after the Cuban Missile crisis. So the Impossible troop is abruptly dismantled by a hapless IMF, which brings us to the account of Ghost Protocol. Hunt must now operate on his own, without the reliance on safe houses and sponsored machinery (they still have tons of it), as much to avert a globe-threatening nuclear crisis as to get a clean-chit for him, and the organization he stands for.

Hunt teams up with an unusually refreshingly trio the glamorously kick-ass Paula Patton, Simon Pegg relieving it with his comedic one-liners (and unfulfilled aspiration to go on a masqueraded mission) and Jeremy Renner, debuting as the inhibited and thoughtful, Brand an analyst who, it is later revealed, had a history with Hunt.

It might be the ultimate fancy of the three screenwriters behind this fourth film, that Ghost Protocol be counted as a plot-driven thriller, but the writing of the central plot per se, is as good as the one that warrants to roll out a Titanic sequel by Paramount. Unquestionably, what essentially drives the plot, and it does so, breath-taxingly, is not just the action but enviably admirable knick-knacks of the tech variety.

Such detailed, and fabulously well-executed are the overwhelming action sequences, Michael Bay may as well as enroll-in for a crash course in chaotic-neatness. The film not only serves the appetite of a devouring action devotee, by obliging with just too-many fangasms, but it also re-confirms the cinematic fundamental of pure escapism.

It is almost like watching a fantasy film.Only that Hogwarts is a sprawling over 2500 ft tall Burj Khalifa.

Clearly aware of the wobbly story thatd open a Pandora box of flaws even if analyzed from a safe distance; the writers keep the proceedings fast-paced with terrific stunts sequentially set, keeping up the grip.

The fight sequences arent cluttered with raining bullets, but often is hand-to-hand combat, lending the film an enormous amount of believability.

The narrative flounders only when a number of totally unnecessary sub-plots are introduced, which seem rather forcefully integrated. Like Anil Kapoors Brij Nath a multi-billionaire Indian Casanova, who is too easily seduced to spit out satellite codes immensely crucial. Later he is dumped back in his ethnically fashioned suite, and what happens to him after the 2-minute cameo, nobody is interested in telling. So, it was probably a diversity thing after all.

Other weakness is the conversational climax of the film, which after the brutally exhausting mission, seems too trivial and laid-back. Comic-relief in due-course is acceptable, and genuinely funny. But after the success, its a little too arrogant, irrelevant and somewhat self-depreciating.

As for the performances, the film is finely cast. Tom Cruise, having lived Ethan Hunt for considerable time, is easy. So easy, he seems mechanical. Paula Patton is sexier when she says her carefully-worded lines, preceded by a quick line of thought. Simon Pegg as the techie Bengie, is a mature sidekick now, assuring enough laughs. Jeremy Renners Brand is not somebody instantly likeable, but able performer that he is, itd be interesting to see how his part is further developed.

Ultimately, Tom Cruise's new film is a blazingly spectacular, memorably terrific, action-thriller. MI4: Ghost Protocol not only makes our imagination reach vertiginous heights by dangerously dangling Cruise over the Burj Khalifa it also tells us what director Brad Bird of the fantastical The Incredibles and Ratatouille can do, with a real film.