Moneyball

Moneyball

3.5 198 Ratings

Directed by : Bennett Miller

Release Date : | Length : 133 Minutes

  • MJ Rating 3.9/5
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plot

Based on a true story, Moneyball is a movie for anybody who has ever dreamed of taking on the system. Brad Pitt stars as Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland As and the guy who assembles the team, who has an epiphany: all of baseballs conventional wisdom is wrong. Forced to reinvent his team on a tight budget, Be...more

Verdict

“A dazzling star cast delivers an awe-inspiring performance making Moneyball exceedingly enthralling. A must watch, not just for the sports geeks but everyone!”

Moneyball Credit & Casting

Brad Pitt

Moneyball Audience Review

Not just another film on sports

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Rated 3.0 / 5
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by Ameet Bhuvan (2,108 DM Points) | See all my reviews

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In one pivotal scene in Money Ball, Pitt asks his daughter not to worry about her father loosing his job. He repeatedly reassures her, while in reality, he is reassuring his own self that nothing is wrong. That it is important to keep faith and believe in yourself when you are swimming against the tide. With clincher moments like this one, Money Ball is as much a film on sports as it is a story of the triumph of perseverance and belief.

Brad Pitt plays Billy Beane, an ex base ball player who is now General Manager of a loosing side. The film traces how he, with his associate Pete, tries to redefine the game of base ball by building a team with players no team was willing to bet on.

In more ways than one, the film mirrors the way sports is handled across the world today. Money speaks, money bags rule, and players are traded instead of being groomed and nurtured. Portions where Pitt's team is dismissed as a fluke despite a record 20 straight wins runs parallel to how our own cricket team is feted one day and rubbished the very next.

The movie also is a comment on how winning is everything for us as a society. How winners are kings, while losers, however good, are worthless. Pitt's character sums this up when he says he hates losing more than he loves winning.

Brad Pitt is the heart of the movie. With his good looks, it is tough to convince the audience to focus on his histrionics. Pitt fails most of the time, making me wonder what warranted the academy nod to his turn in the film. Yet, in flashes, his brilliance shines bright, and you know this is a career defining act by the actor.

Pete, played by Joahn Hill, is the other delightful act in the movie. He mixes intelligence naivety and sincerity into an endearing mix, holding his own int he midst of a towering Brad Pitt.

Director Bennet Miller weaves an engaging plot throughout and despite being slow, there is not a low moment in the movie. For Hindi film buffs, the direction and storytelling runs eerily parallel to Chak De India, another real life story of an underdog sportsman out to prove a point to the world. Watch this for some fine cinema, even if sports is not your idea of a nice evening at the theaters.