The Iron Lady

The Iron Lady

3.1 159 Ratings

Directed by : Phyllida Lloyd

Release Date : | Length : 105 Minutes

  • Critics Rating 2.6/5
  • MJ Rating 3.0/5
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The Iron Lady tells the compelling story of Margaret Thatcher, a woman who smashed through the barriers of gender and class to be heard in a male-dominated world. The story concerns power and the price that is paid for power, and is a surprising and intimate portrait of an extraordinary and complex woman.


“There are flaws in the film’s scripting and execution but Oscar winner Meryl Streep’s stupendous performance puts them all in the shade and makes The Iron Lady an enjoyable experience.”

The Iron Lady Credit & Casting

Meryl Streep


The Iron Lady Audience Review

The Lady sweeps you off your feet

| by Ameet Bhuvan |
Rated 3.0 / 5
| See all my reviews

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Biopics are tricky, finding the right balance between performances and a script that dissects the individual's life is difficult. The Iron Lady manages to throw up a powerhouse performance; however as a film it is mediocre.

The movie begins with an aging and dementia ridden Thatcher, who is hallucinating about her dead husband still being around her, and reflecting on her life.

Random episodes from her eventful life flash out, as memories in her fragile mind pop up out of nowhere. The film then takes us into the world of a young Thatcher, an ambitious free spirited girl who would place only her husband and father at par with herself while dominating every other being in her sight.

From here, the movie focuses on Thatcher the politician, touching upon her tumultuous and controversial reign over Britain with an Iron fist.

Problem with the film is that the makers choose to touch upon too many things and incidents in Thatcher's life at the cost of a cerebral and incisive analysis of key events that defined the lady and her career. There are all the milestones that any history buff can identify with, yet there is no moral or political angle to it. Her flaws are pointed out, yet none of her impact on Britain and world history is accounted for. Nothing is examined enough, since the film is seen through Thatchers view point and sorely lacks a counter argument to her analysis of events.

What makes one overlook these flaws however is the astounding performance by Meryl Streep as Thatcher the Prime Minister, and Thatcher the old lady with dementia. She manages to put up a multifaceted portrait of Thatcher, encompassing her insecurities, her rigidity, utter contempt for her colleagues and a zeal for dominance. Meryl rises above the lopsided script, making Thatcher a study of growing old, losing trust and doubting ones abilities as well as of those around you.

Her nuances and subtlety take this turn as Thatcher right next to her portrayal of Julia Child in Julie and Julia, one of the all-time great performances of our times. She makes an otherwise mediocre movie into an immensely watchable affair. Watch this one only for her.