The King's Speech

The King's Speech

3.6 195 Ratings

Directed by : Tom Hooper

Release Date : | Length : 118 Minutes

  • MJ Rating 3.5/5
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plot

The story of the man who became King George VI, the father of Queen Elizabeth II. After his brother abdicates, George ('Bertie') reluctantly assumes the throne. Plagued by a dreaded stammer and considered unfit to be king, Bertie engages the help of an unorthodox speech therapist named Lionel Logue. Through a set of unexpecte...more

Verdict

“It bagged the best Actor as well as the best Film Oscar this year. A cinematic treat. Must watch!”

The King's Speech Credit & Casting

Colin Firth

The King's Speech Audience Review

B...B...B...loody Awesome !

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Rated 4.0 / 5
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by Manu Agrawal (50 DM Points) | See all my reviews

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Boy !! I never thought that a film about a stuttering man could be so much fun !!
For whatever it's worth, this one's a remarkably well made movie. I won't enter into the debate of whether it's actually the best one made this year, because I haven't seen them all.

A period drama, 'The King's Speech' is both witty and dramatic in its portrayal of the life of King George the VIth while he ascends the throne of England and tries to overcome his stammering problem. There are comic scenes aplenty: for instance, the one where Colin Firth makes fun of himself when he meets Lionel Logue the speech therapist (played by Geoffrey Rush), or the one where Lionel sits on a royal Chair and incites the King. Or finally the one where he asks Firth to swear and use the F-word. The dramatic angle is intact too, as Firth is adept at making the audience sympathize with a man trying hard to do succeed. The King's traumatic back story of being turned into a Right handed man from a lefty almost made me remember Taare Zameen Par.

I would have however, liked Guy Pearce (playing David, Colin Firth's elder brother) to put up a decent fight while relinquishing the throne thus providing more masala. He has been truly wasted in a under developed role. The same can be said about Helena Bonham Carter (she might have lost the Supporting Role Oscar for the same very reason) who is full of poise despite her horrible hairdo.

The film is a cinematic treat with great production values and a truly old world look and feel (set in the 1930s). It has found favor with the critics, and doesn't deprive you of a couple of hours of entertainment either.

PS - It was, perhaps, just a couple of notches below 'The Fighter'. It was higher on positivity, though.