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All audience reviews of Amour

  • Amour: Movie Review

    Merkwürdige Liebe

    Rated 
    3.5
    Desimartini | Updated - October 27, 2013 14:04 PM IST
    3.1DM (66 ratings)

    Verdict - The stellar performances drive the film, and there are moments of pure grace.

    AmourWatch trailerRelease date : October 25, 2013



    Michael Haneke's Amour, his second Palme d'Or winner in only three years, reproduces on screen the quintessence of the lugubrious old-age life. For a significant part of the film, the plot plays a second fiddle to the film's prime purpose, that of making the viewer sense the tedium that is the life his characters undergo, ascetically highlighting the perfunctory nature of it all where there's fine line between love and liability. Although his aesthetic resonates what it's like to live in the world his characters inhibit, Haneke isn't after making us feel the characters' emotions. There is a marked austerity with which he merely gazes into the abyss that is the everyday humdrum, coldly watching his characters crumble and breakdown from a distance. His world is somber, and its grimness arises not out of sordid human fragility as in Antonioni's oeuvre, but out of the sheer practicality of it all. And while the Italian filmmaker's films had a crescendo of hope, usually in form of something surreally arcane, like the extended orgy sequence in Zabriskie Point or the profoundly cathartic mime-sequence in Blow-Up, the characters' isolated world in Amour is single-headedly steadily decaying. With the monotonous lifelessness percolating the very narrative and the aesthetic of it all, at times it comes across as a complacent exercise diegesis on old-age, but there are moments of pure grace.

    • Storyline
    • Direction
    • Acting
    • Cinematography
    • Music

more audience reviews

  • Merkwürdige Liebe

    Merkwürdige Liebe

    200 Reviews , 65 Followers
    Rated 3.5October 27, 2013

    Amour: Movie Review

    Michael Haneke's Amour, his second Palme d'Or winner in only three years, reproduces on screen the quintessence of the lugubrious old-age life. For...read more