Tribhanga Review: Kajol's Film Stops Short Of Establishing A Connection Despite Having Its Heart In The Right Place

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    Tribhanga Review: Kajol's Film Stops Short Of Establishing A Connection Despite Having Its Heart In The Right Place

    2.5
    Tribhanga Movie Review | Kajol | Tanvi Azmi
    Tribhanga Review: Kajol's Film Stops Short Of Establishing A Connection Despite Having Its Heart In The Right Place
    Updated : January 15, 2021 05:25 PM IST

    Kajol, Tanvi Azmi and Mithila Palkar starrer Tribhanga may be a story about mother daughter bonds but if you expect this film to deliver parenting lessons then you might as well think twice before you decide to press that play button. Renuka Shahane’s film instead is about the different formulas one might apply to parenting and simply hope for the best.

    The story that kicks off with acclaimed author Nayantara (Tanvi Amzi) getting a brain stroke in the middle of recording for her autobiography and slipping into a coma, reunites her with her spirited actress daughter, Anuradha (Kajol) who otherwise chooses to keep her distance due to their strained past. Kajol’s Anu who always felt her mother never cared enough, is rather possessive about her own daughter Masha (Mithila Palkar) who is married in a very conservative family very unlike her own.

    Kajol who bears a grudge against her mother for moving in and out of marriages decides never to get married because of how her mother’s relationships scared her, without realizing how her choices in life reflect on her own daughter. This dilemma forms the crux of the entire narrative.

    Coming to performances Kajol seems to be in her essence powering through scenes. Her character however is rather crude and an avatar of hers we’ve never seen before. What’s more is that she seems to be enjoying herself in the censor free world off an OTT film.

     The novelty of this refreshing persona, however, fades quickly and while we expect her to somber up as the plot thickens it doesn’t happen and it makes you feel distracted even when emotions are running high in the scene.

    Mithila is sincere with what little she’s been given to do in the story of this triad, with her own narrative being rushed through. Tanvi Azmi certainly levels the field in this mix with her mature and grounded performance. With most of her screen time playing out in recordings or flashbacks as she lies in a hospital bed in a coma one can relate with her emotions as problems play out as they happened.

    In supporting roles, Kunal Roy Kapoor plays the biographer and adherent follower of Nayantara. The man plays a big role in putting the pieces of the puzzle together but his rather caricaturist portrayal never makes you completely believe his noble intentions.

    While the film couldn’t be more women-centric, the narrative of Vaibhav Tatwawaadi’s Robindro, Nayantara’s son and Anu’s brother, needed a little more fleshing out.

    Renuka Shahne’s Tribhanga has its heart in the right place but ultimately just stops short of stirring the emotions that you know it wants to convey. Performances aside the dialogues in many places lack conviction in saying what needs to be said and certain narratives which are big pieces in the story of these three women remain underexplored.

    Tribhanga could have been a revelation as far as family dramas go but ends up in the mediocre pile due to the lack of connection.

    Updated: January 15, 2021 05:25 PM IST